3 Book-to-Film Box Office Winners That Deviated from the Originals

Most people say that films based on books always disappoint and that their novel versions are usually more entertaining. This is due to the fact that film adaptations, more often than not, have to cut “scenes” from the book due to running time constraints. The original story also tends to get lost in translation as it could be interpreted differently by the screenwriter and director.

Another factor is the cast of actors in movie adaptations. Sometimes, actors portray their roles differently from what you might have imagined based on reading the book.

Given all these factors, some movie adaptations get really bad reviews. Sometimes, it might just be better for you to wait for them to be released on DVD or grabbed online with your handy video downloader. However, some still turn out to be blockbuster hits.

You be the judge. Below are three recently released movies that turned out to be significantly different from their original book versions, yet made a huge buzz in the entertainment scene.

Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief

The Percy Jackson book series is one of the most popular titles in the young adult market today. Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief is the first of the series, and it talks about the twelve-year-old Percy Jackson as he finally arrives at a secret training facility for demigods called Camp Half-Blood.

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His adventure starts after talking with the Oracle. Percy immediately goes on a quest to look for Zeus’ lost master bolt. Together with his satyr friend Grover and fellow camper Annabeth, Percy heads out to the Underworld to confront the prime suspect Hades as they battle monsters. Although Percy manages to retrieve the master bolt, he also reveals a story of betrayal among the gods that could ruin Olympus.

In the movie, released in 2010, Percy is already sixteen years old when he arrives at Camp Half-Blood. After Hades issues him a challenge, Percy sneaks out of camp and takes up the quest to recover Zeus’ lost master bolt. While being accompanied by the Grover and Annabeth, Percy goes on with his journey with the aid of a map of contrivance that is very particular about where to find pearls that grant escape from the Underworld.

The book describes Percy as someone who is cool and proud of being a demigod. Also, aside from helping Percy with his quest, Grover and Annabeth are fully developed characters in their own rights. The screen version showcased that Percy is a little emotional. This version of him is pretty much devoid of all humor, and he tends to freak out a lot. However, he has that distinct advantage of being portrayed by Logan Lerman.

Understandably, the book has more allowance for Percy to go into more exciting adventures and mishaps. On the other hand, the action scenes from the movie are a bit more intense than what was written on the book.

Considering these differences, you can pick out which version has the more dynamic scenes as you join Percy in his quests.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

The book’s author, Ransom Rigg, initially had the idea to make a picture book out of photographs that he had compiled from his hobby as a photograph collector. However, with advice from an editor, he decided to make a novel based on the photographs he collected. This is when Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children came to be.

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The novel told the story of Jacob and his relationship with a particular woman named Emma. Emma was in love with Jacob’s grandfather when he was the same as Jacob’s age during the beginning of the tale. She begins to fall for Jacob now that he has found out about the peculiar children. In the story, it was all possible because Emma is unable to age.

As with the book version, the live action adaptation brings the story to life with Tim Burton’s beautiful style of movie direction. The movie is very visually pleasing, and although the story has been altered from the plot line in the book, it is still enjoyable to watch.

One of the key elements in the story is the ymbrynes, the ladies that look over peculiar children who have the ability to manipulate time.

As the story goes, they were kidnapped by the wight, while Jacob, Emma, Millard, Enoch, and Bronwyn went outside of the loop looking for answers about the monster. However, the movie had the wight take only Miss Peregrine while all the kids were in the house.

This conflict eventually leads to a climactic fight scene between the peculiar children and the wights. Though the movie set it up at an amusement park. The original story placed the final standoff at a lighthouse.

Also, considering the book version, Jacob did not track down the peculiar children after regretting leaving them behind. However, the adaptation showed how he went out to find them right after saying goodbye to his dad.

For whatever reason, there is a significant number of differences between the book and the movie for Miss Peregrine. The respective styles of storytelling have created exciting moments for all the fans of this peculiar tale in both media.

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay

The Hunger Games has become an iconic tale for book lovers all over the world. It tells the tale of Katniss Everdeen and the world she lives in after a great civil rebellion. The premise is exciting and dramatic enough as a book, but it was when Lionsgate decided to bring it to the big screen that this franchise became a true classic. 

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As a trilogy, The Hunger Games book series allowed the movie to split its final book to two full-length films. The movie adaptation of the last two installments of The Hunger Games movie sequel created twist and turns of its own to make the huge fanbase love the title even more.

One of the most critical scene in the movie was when Peeta was taken down and the broadcast is interrupted immediately after he revealed on air that District 13 was soon to be bombed. His warning went straight to the point by saying that the Capitol was going to bomb District 13, instead of saying that they would soon be dead by morning. In the book, the scene actually went on much longer.

This story adjustment was a preparation to the whole rescue mission for Peeta and the other victors. The book tells that whole mission is performed off-screen and that there is no communication at all with the rescue team. However, in the movie, the whole event made it to film. Also, the conversation between Snow and Katniss via video chat during the rescue mission does not actually happen in the book.

Towards the end of Katniss’ adventure in the novel, she was pushed into the crowd of Capitol refugees outside Snow’s mansion when the Rebels suddenly presented themselves during the invasion of the Capitol. But the rebels invaded the Capitol much earlier in the book, and that is why Katniss, Gale, and refugees marched towards Snow’s mansion.

The Hunger Games is without a doubt a masterpiece to cherish for years to come. It has made readers think about their current reality and how their choices could lead to a dystopian future. Whether you choose the book or the movie, you can feel the energy and excitement their world, characters and conflict bring to your very existence.

Understanding the Book Publication Process

Books have provided mankind with a platform to learn, to entertain, and to inform. Since olden times, books have been regarded as a symbol for knowledge and organization. While books do reflect a certain level of cultural significance, their longevity is now being challenged by the seemingly expansive nature of the technology.

Hardbound books are being reproduced less and less these days because of the advent of the ebooks and readers. Knowledge is expanding much faster over the Internet, with every bit of information being transformed to a digital form. However, the good thing about it is that while technology has provided a new platform to read, books are still fighting for their lives in the physical realm. Besides, nothing beats a good book in hand on a rainy Tuesday – not an iPad or an Android Tablet. A book provides that venerated vibe that true readers would only understand.

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The question now is “How does one’s favorite book come to be?”

In order to truly appreciate a book, one must comprehend the stages  it undergoes before it lands on your fingertips. This article zeroes in on the book publication process, the intricacies behind it, and how it is still thriving in the market today.

The Manuscript

Before any book is published, the exists the person behind the words. An author would have to spend a considerable amount of time creating his or her piece of art before it even goes to the press. Utilizing various writing processes, a writer whips up a story specific to the genre he or she has selected. Authors are aware of the best works out there, and try to scan each and every resource they can to create something authentic that would satiate consumers all across the globe.

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An author’s manuscript can have varying lengths that require varying amounts of production time to finally be considered finished. Some authors finish their pieces of art in days such as John Boyne when writing the “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas”. That was done in 2 and a half days. Anthony Burgess wrote “A Clockwork Orange” in 3 weeks. Then again, there are some authors who take their time in writing their great works. J.D Salinger’s “The Catcher in the Rye” was a 10-year work, while Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables” was a 12-year masterpiece. J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic fantasy trilogy “The Lord of the Rings” is a work of art that took 16-years to complete.

All in all, the manuscript a writer produces takes some time to complete. This is where the book publishing process starts.

Acquisition

When the manuscript is ready, it then undergoes the acquisition stage. This is where publishing houses look at an author’s work and decide whether it is publishable or not. Once an editor agrees to read a manuscript, it has passed a critical test. If the editors likes what they read  and think it’s a good fit for their list, they would then move forward with a proposal to acquire the book. However, this doesn’t mean it’s a done deal.

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Publishing begins with acquisition and highly depends on this step. Acquisition for a publisher is like planting seeds for a farmer, or creating new models for a car manufacturer. Without it, there would be no products to sell in the future, thus no income. This is why publishers are so careful about what they acquire, and take so much time deciding over it. Committing to publish one book means committing to spending or otherwise investing thousands, if not millions, of dollars in advances, staff time, plant costs, paper/printing/binding costs, and marketing expenses, with income from the book not expected for at least a year.

Once an author’s work is selected by the editor, it is time for both parties to sign a contract. When the author and the publishers have agreed to the acquisition, the writer loses all rights and control over how the book would be published.

Revisions

As soon as the manuscript is acquired by the publishing house, it undergoes a variety of edits and revisions. This is one of the most arduous stages in the process as everyone is trying to provide the best possible content. In fact, many writers often highlight editing as the hardest part there is in the writing process. Today’s book industry is so competitive that most acquired manuscripts don’t require significant editorial overhauls. Those needing lots of attention—whether they’re riddled with technical errors or in need of heavy restructuring—rarely make it past the agent.

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Today’s editors more often request minor rewrites or reworks on the manuscripts they acquire. When it is reviewed, it is then passed back to the author to revise under strict deadlines. When the author of the book returns on the set deadline, it undergoes review again. All in all, there are no specific numbers for editor revisions. It depends on how satisfied the editor is.

Production

As soon as the author and the editors of the book are satisfied with the work, it is passed onto the production line. In the moment when the title is ready, it is scheduled for publication together with its release month. Publishers recognize timeliness as a factor in their sales, so the release date is set on a month that they think is perfect timing.

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The release dates often depend on the number of contracts under the genre of the writer, as well as how timely the topic is. Say for example, a book regarding politics would be more effective if it were released during the months leading up to an election. Publishers often have a good idea when a book can have the greatest chance to sell.

Publishing houses then provide a set number of copies, which are developed during acquisition. The publishers have a legitimate claim on the number of copies they will produce in order to be profitable for both the author and the company. This is usually known as the “budget number” for each book. This number is the basis of how much attention to detail your title receives. With limited time and resources to produce thousands of titles, the budget number is one way for publishers to prioritize projects.

Another element in the production line is the development of the book cover. While it may be a relatively minor factor for readers, it is a huge deal for publisher because it provides the first impression of the contents of the book itself.

When the designs are ready and the number of copies has been achieved, publishers market the book through advertising activities, promotions, and publicity gigs. Bigger houses often provide authors a book conference where writers can discuss the contents of their books in a more personal way.

Sales and Distribution

Once the title has been marketed, sales representatives begin to present it to bookstores for selling. Titles are typically sold months in advance of publication, so most titles being presented usually come out months from the actual publication and release date. This gives the publisher plenty of time to assess all orders, make adjustments as needed, and print the right number of copies for distribution to the marketplace.

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Publishers utilize a variety of ways to distribute the copies. It all depends on the proximity, convenience, and costs of distribution. For example, many publishers in Canada acquire services from Toronto movers, who then deliver books in bulk orders to the nearest bookstores, and even to farther book hot spots as dictated by the distribution list.

9 Books to Help You Become a Better Insurance Agent

 

With the growing demand for insurance products, various books have become available to help you become a better insurance agent. Ranging from general life tips, specific guides for insurance agents, and books about the economy from a different perspective, these resources can be can make you stand out among the competition.

 

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The Sales Bible: The Ultimate Sales Resource

By Jeffrey Gitomer

Jeffrey Gitomer wouldn’t call it the Sales Bible for nothing. This book is quite the one-size-fits-all book that you need if you’re looking for a sales resource.

Almost anything and everything you want to know about the sales process can be found in this book. It also includes basic knowledge and advanced techniques that you may encounter in your business. From simple tips and tricks to complex sales and marketing strategies, Gitomer’s bestselling classic runs the gamut. Regardless of whether you are a novice agent or seasoned sales pro, this one is a must-read.

 

The World is Flat

By Thomas L. Friedman

 

Aside from insurance and sales guides, it is also important for you to understand the economic pressures and competition that different companies across different industries are now facing. This is why books like Thomas L. Friedman’s The World Is Flat is a definite good read for insurance agents.

 

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The World Is Flat is an essential update on globalization, its opportunities for individual empowerment, its achievements at lifting millions out of poverty and the environmental, social and political drawbacks. In a narrative punctuated by case studies, interviews and sometimes surprising statistics, Friedman tells his reader this: Be prepared, because a phenomenon waits for no one.

 

Without rhetoric or scare tactics, he paints a picture of a world moving faster than most can keep up. This book presents not only the problems that the corporate world faces, but also preventative measures and possible solutions.

 

New Sales. Simplified.

By Mike Weinberg

 

New customers are the lifeblood of any business. However, for the average salesperson, the process of acquiring new customers creates anxiety and confusion. In New Sales. Simplified, Mike Weinberg suggests that new sales success is not achieved through complicated strategies, but by executing the basics well. By drawing from his years of experience as a sales executive and coach, Weinberg provides salespeople of all experience levels with a well-structured framework to identify the best target accounts, leverage key sales tools and plan successful new sales strategies.

Especially relevant for new salespeople with small client bases, Weinberg’s volume is all about successful prospecting practices.

However, it doesn’t just stop there. You can learn how to interact with different types of clients more effectively to build stronger relationships and close more deals, which is ultimately what every good sales book should be striving to accomplish.

 

The Psychology of Selling

By Brian Tracy

 

In order to sell to someone, you need to know what they’re thinking — and why. With that said, it also helps to identify your own motivations at the most basic level. Brian Tracy’s The Psychology of Selling lays it all out, leading you to a greater understanding of sales in general and, as a result, a significant boost in your numbers.

 

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There’s a reason why firms like Big Lou still sell insurance even when they are up against the giants of the industry. They perform smart targeting. They have well-defined targets, and create a striking difference from the rest of the players in insurance.

By applying the psychology of selling, Tracey writes, you can sell insurance no matter what.

 

The Secrets of Closing the Sale

By Zig Ziglar

 

There’s a good chance you have already read this all-time great, or at least heard of it. If you haven’t, there’s no time like the present. If you already have, it probably couldn’t hurt to revisit its impactful lessons.

Zig Ziglar focuses on imbuing meaning within the relationships between you and your customers using his book The Secrets of Closing the Sale. It focuses on the strong relationships that can foster trust, and in turn, sales growth. Again, almost every successful agent has read this book, because it is very useful and easy to read.

 

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Ziglar emphasizes that you have to cover “all of the bases” in order to reach the close. You have to find a prospective customer. You have to make an appointment to meet the prospect. You have to build up initial rapport and trust. You have to tell the prospect a good story. You have to answer the prospect’s objections. Then you can close the sale. His motto to summarize this philosophy is, “You can get everything in life you want if you’ll just help enough other people get what they want.”

 

The Best Damn Sales Book Ever

By Warren Greshes

 

Warren Greshes might sound a bit overconfident about his book, but he won’t give a book such a confident title without the content to back it up. The title is fitting, as The Best Damn Sales Book Ever emphasizes that confidence and positivity are integral components of sales success.

“The big secret to sales success? A simple truth: Motivated, positive, goal-oriented people are usually the ones who sell the most. Even if you don’t think you have these vital qualities, you can develop them in yourself — with the right help.”

This declaration in the book says it all. It can help you boost your confidence in selling, but it can also help you back up your confidence by making you a better agent in general.

 

You Can’t Teach a Kid to Ride a Bike at a Seminar / The Sandler Submarine

By David Sandler

 

If you are having trouble getting people to buy what you are selling, this book could offer a different approach by teaching you the rough basics of selling something. Davin Sandler offers great insights for improving your sales presentations. His book revolves around five rules of sales success:

  1. Qualify your prospects.
  2. Extract your prospect’s “pain.”
  3. Verify that the prospect has money.
  4. Be sure the prospect is a decision maker.
  5. Match your service or product to the prospect’s “pain.”

 

To complement these rules, Sandler has created a book that defines a seven-step sales process he aptly calls The Sandler Submarine:

  1. Bonding and rapport
  2. Up-front contracts
  3. Pain
  4. Budget
  5. Decision
  6. Fulfillment
  7. Post-Sell

The name comes from this idea: As you finish each step, you close and lock a “water-tight door” so the prospect can’t return to it. Sandler presents techniques to do this and therefore put the salesperson in control of the sales process.

 

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High-Payoff Selling: Being Visible and Viable in the New Insurance Market

By Richard Coskren

 

While the other books on the list can help agents succeed via generalized sales advice, Richard Coskren’s High-Payoff Selling is directly focused on the insurance industry. It’s a full-on approach to integrating your life and work goals, customizing the services you offer and securing your status within the industry based on your merits, rather than the size of your business.

 

As its title suggests, it helps readers in being visible in the highly competitive world of insurance marketing. It can help you penetrate the market even when you’re just starting. More importantly, it makes you viable in the insurance market by helping you become an effective agent if you follow the tips it openly shares to you.

5 Steps to Getting Your Work Published

A Simple Guide to Becoming a Published Author

At one point in your life, you’ve probably had a surplus of ideas, and you dreamed of getting them published. It could be a fictional novel, a guide book, or a manuscript that you want to be published. Undoubtedly, it is every writer’s dream.

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But how can someone actually get their work published?

Jump right in, and learn from the experts! Start your very own dream book with these five simple steps that will allow you to have your work published, and set your sights on becoming the writer that you have always dreamed of being.

Brief Notes for Writers (Bonus)

Focus *first on your writing.

Write and write and write some more so that you can improve your skills in writing over time. Do NOT put most of your thoughts into the process of how to get your book published. Instead, set your mind on finishing your book, and finishing it well.

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There are also many ways to effectively edit your work. After finishing your first draft, have a nice long break; travel to another place, or just simply do something else and clear your mind. Now that you have cleared your mind, you will have a fresher outlook on editing your work.

With this fresh perspective, you will be able to add both subtlety and complexity to your work. A good suggestion would be to get away from it all. Perhaps try taking that dream vacation to California, or perhaps rent some nice and exclusive house and land Perth with RedInk Homes, or simply seclude yourself from the busy city life. Whatever it takes for you to commit your undivided attention towards your book. Editing and revising work is of high importance in getting your first masterpiece published.

Also, keep in mind that your first work is just as critical as your second or third work. With this being kept in mind, you should focus on putting the same amount of effort and focus into each piece to ensure that none of your books are “half baked”. Make sure that before you try to have your work published, you are confident that all of your work meets your high standards across the board.

If you are looking to publish as quickly as possible, you can always try online outlets such as blog sites, websites or online reading communities (such as Wattpad). It is a very interesting option for creative writing, and it can also facilitate peer reviewing in case you want to factor in constructive criticism before actually publishing your work.

Lastly, be on the lookout for editors, agents or publishers. You can befriend a few, or you can perform extensive research on which editor, agent or publisher would best fit your choice. Knowing people or franchises is of utmost importance to guaranteeing your success – or at the very least a fair deal.

Step 1: Determine Your Work’s Genre or Category

Now, you have to identify what your genre or category is. Are you a fiction or nonfiction writer? The thing is, there are significantly different paths taken by novelists of fiction compared to non fiction authors.

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  • For novels, memoirs, and other fiction books: After finishing your manuscript and making sure that it is done precisely the way you want it published, it is now time to approach editors or agents. Again, it’s important to be 100 percent confident with your work. You may be very excited about your story idea, or about having a partial manuscript, but it’s almost never a good idea to pitch your work to a publishing professional at such an early stage. Finish the work first. It is also advisable to look for critiques, mentors, or peer advisories who can offer you constructive feedback, so that you can improve your work. One of the biggest mistakes new writers make is rushing to get the work published.
  • For most nonfiction: Rather than completing a manuscript, you should write a book proposal  —which acts like a business plan for your book—that will convince a publisher to contract and pay you to write the book. You need to methodically research the market for your idea before you begin to write the proposal. Find other titles that are competitive or comparable to your own; make sure that your book is unique, but also doesn’t break all the rules of the category it’s meant to succeed in.

Step 2: Evaluate Your Book’s Commercial Potential

The commercial viability of books varies wildly. Some books could be big enough to be suitable for the Big Five traditional publishers – like that of Penguin Random House and HarperCollins. As for the relatively smaller scale, they are suitable only for mid-size and small scale publishing work. However, the most important thing to remember is that not every book or book idea is meant to be published by a major publisher, or represented by an agent. The problem is that most writers – especially beginner authors – have a difficult time being honest with themselves about their work’s potential.

Here are some of the primary styles of books that Jane Freidman, the Chief Executive Officer and Co-founder of Open Road Integrated Media, which is a company that specializes in traditional and eBook publishing, said are most suitable for a Big Five traditional publisher.

The genre of commercial fiction would include such categories as: romance, erotica, mystery, crime, thriller, science fiction, fantasy, and young adult. In addition to this list, there are nonfiction books that would get shelved in your average Barnes & Noble or indie bookstore—which requires a strong hook or concept and author platform. Usually a New York publisher won’t sign a nonfiction book unless they anticipate selling 10,000–20,000 copies at a minimum.

Step 3: Looking For The Right Publisher

Once you know what you’re selling, it’s time to research which publishers or agents accept the type of work you’ve written. Sadly, most publishers – especially major publishers – do not accept submissions which aren’t supervised by legitimate agents.

The good thing is, there are many online guides – even online agencies – that can help a lot with you finding the right agent for your book. Writersmarket.com provides thousands of book publishers available for the taking. PublishersMarketplace.com, on the other hand, is the best place to research literary agents because, not only does it have many member pages, you can also search their database by genre, category, and/or keyword to pinpoint the best agents for your work.

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Step 4: Complying With Submission Requirements

While each publisher or agent will require different submission requirements, here are the three most common required materials and how they are best prepared:

  • Query letter. This is a 1-page pitch letter that gives a brief description of your work.
  • Novel synopsis. This is a brief summary (usually no more than 1-2 pages) of your story, from beginning to end. It must reveal the ending. This is very important as it could very well be the selling point for any agent.
  • Sample chapters. When choosing sample chapters that can best showcase your book in submission, start from the beginning of the manuscript. It usually has more impact and more of a draw for the reader, and it is a sure-fire way to paint a good picture of your book for the agents to consider.

Step 5: Submit Your Materials And Wait

Almost no agent, publishing house, or editor accepts full manuscripts on first contact, and this is why they keep the sign “No unsolicited materials” in submission guidelines. What they ask for is a Query Letter, which is why you should focus on making your query letter a convincing one.

After you submit your query letter, you’ll get three general kinds of responses:

a.) No response

b.) A request for sample chapters and/or synopsis

c.) A request for the whole manuscript and additional documents

In the grand scheme of things, a non-response usually means a rejection.

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However, don’t let a rejection get you down! Remember, almost every famous and successful author has experienced hundreds, if not thousands, of rejections. Do not just abandon your work if you think that it should be published. Talk to the agent or publishing house and find out where your novel went wrong and how it can be improved.

Publishing your work also entails a lot more than just submission. You also have to factor in protecting rights to your work, the publishing industry in general, and a lot more that comes with being an author. Right now, however, all you have to do is to think about these five steps thoroughly in order to focus on having your work published.

6 Fiction Books Published in the 90s That Continue To Enchant Readers

hd34888As an ardent book lover, I’m always curious about how a book has been received over a period of time. It is an indication of the power of books and how they can withstand our changing society or propel change in one’s perspective.

The 1990s is my favorite decade. Not only because it was the time of “Barbie Girl” and “Spice Up Your Life,” but there were a plethora of books published that captured the attention of bookworms around the world. From a magical wizarding world to a former combat nurse turned outlander, authors created stories and characters that sucked us in from the very first page. And, they continue to enchant readers of today. Below are six books published in the 90s that are still well loved and continually growing in popularity.

1. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone – J.K. Rowling

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First published in 1997 (UK) and 1998 (US).

I don’t think this book requires an explanation. If you believe it requires an explanation, then you’ve been living under a rock; and you should go to your local library or bookstore. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone has changed everything.

2. The Giver – Lois Lowry

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First published in 1993.

The Giver has been hailed as one of the most influential novels of our time. Lowry’s imaginative story challenges the status quo and introduces readers to a world that is both real and unreal. It’s so much more than a YA novel. I think the novel continues to capture our attention because it hits close to home in an enlightening manner. It effectively comments on our world and how we see it, as well as how we see ourselves.

3. The Perks of Being a Wallflower – Stephen Chbosky

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First published in 1999.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a coming-of-age story that explores teenage angst, friendship, sexuality, and the power of education. The protagonist, Charlie, is lovable and relatable. So, it’s no surprise that Chbosky’s novel continues to enchant readers in 2016.

4. Outlander – Diana Gabaldon

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First published in 1991.

Time-travel, love, and desire. What more could you ask for? Outlander encompasses everything you want in a novel.

5. A Game of Thrones – George R.R. Martin

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First published in 1996.

Epic fantasy novels never get old. And, it’s safe to say that A Game of Thrones has taken over the 2000s for its juicy plot filled with vengeance, power, and greed.

6. The Notebook – Nicholas Sparks

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First published in 1996.

Nicholas Sparks is a seasoned romance writer. One of his books that touched many is The Notebook. A story about true love, social hierarchy, and fate. Our world is full of romantics and I think that is what makes this book (and many of his books) so enchanting until this day.

What book published in the 90s enchants you?


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hd34888As an ardent book lover, I’m always curious about how a book has been received over a period of time. It is an indication of the power of books and how they can withstand our changing society or propel change in one’s perspective. The 1990s is my favorite decade. Not only because it was the time of “Barbie Girl” and “Spice Up Your Life,” but there were a plethora of books published that captured the attention of bookworms around the world. From a magical wizarding world to a former combat nurse turned outlander, authors created stories and characters that sucked us in from the very first page. And, they continue to enchant readers of today. Below are six books published in the 90s that are still well loved and continually growing in popularity.   1. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone – J.K. Rowling harry_potter_and_the_philosophers_stone_book_cover First published in 1997 (UK) and 1998 (US). I don’t think this book requires an explanation. If you believe it requires an explanation, then you’ve been living under a rock; and you should go to your local library or bookstore. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone has changed everything. 2. The Giver – Lois Lowry 81cjcheqjsl First published in 1993. The Giver has been hailed as one of the most influential novels of our time. Lowry’s imaginative story challenges the status quo and introduces readers to a world that is both real and unreal. It’s so much more than a YA novel. I think the novel continues to capture our attention because it hits close to home in an enlightening manner. It effectively comments on our world and how we see it, as well as how we see ourselves. 3. The Perks of Being a Wallflower – Stephen Chbosky perksofbeingwallflower1 First published in 1999. The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a coming-of-age story that explores teenage angst, friendship, sexuality, and the power of education. The protagonist, Charlie, is lovable and relatable. So, it’s no surprise that Chbosky’s novel continues to enchant readers in 2016. 4. Outlander – Diana Gabaldon outlander-blue-cover-198x300 First published in 1991. Time-travel, love, and desire. What more could you ask for? Outlander encompasses everything you want in a novel. 5. A Game of Thrones – George R.R. Martin 13496 First published in 1996. Epic fantasy novels never get old. And, it’s safe to say that A Game of Thrones has taken over the 2000s for its juicy plot filled with vengeance, power, and greed. 6. The Notebook – Nicholas Sparks the_notebook_cover First published in 1996. Nicholas Sparks is a seasoned romance writer. One of his books that touched many is The Notebook. A story about true love, social hierarchy, and fate. Our world is full of romantics and I think that is what makes this book (and many of his books) so enchanting until this day.

What book published in the 90s enchants you?

The Other Widow By Susan Crawford | Book Review

hcc-first-look-the-other-widow-susan-crawfordEverybody’s luck runs out. This time it could be theirs…

Susan Crawford, author of the psychological thriller The Pocket Wife, does it again with her new novel, The Other Widow. With a complex cast of characters—featuring the perspectives of three strong women brought together by a tragic accident—Crawford captures the very essence of grief felt by a widow and the other woman, haunting love, and obsession.

I delight in all thrillers; whether they are fast-paced or slowly built up. The Other Widow falls into the latter unlike her debut novel, The Pocket Wife, which falls into the former. That being said, it’s just as absorbing as it steadily examines the psychological impacts of deception, vulnerability, and desire.

There are so many layers of deception that compel the reader to continually question every single character and detail therein contained. Crawford’s braintwisting plot will keep readers on the edge of their seats, yearning for the next page right until the very startling end. I guarantee that you won’t put it down because I wasn’t able to do so!

This is a marvelous book for enthusiastic fans of thrillers and mysteries. Moreover, readers of chick-lit and chick-noir will revel in the perspectives of Dorrie, Karen, and Maggie.

The Other Widow hits bookstores today! So, make sure to head there right now. Seriously, what are you still doing here? Go pick up the book!


A huge thank you to HarperCollins Canada for selecting me to be one of ten keen readers to be a part of the First Look program. They provided me with an uncorrected proof of The Other Widow by Susan Crawford in exchange for an honest review.


Book details: Fiction | April 2016 | William Morrow (An imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers) | 978-0-06-236288-9 | $26.99 ($33.50 Can.) | 352 Pages |

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

hcc-first-look-the-other-widow-susan-crawfordEverybody’s luck runs out. This time it could be theirs… Susan Crawford, author of the psychological thriller The Pocket Wife, does it again with her new novel, The Other Widow. With a complex cast of characters—featuring the perspectives of three strong women brought together by a tragic accident—Crawford captures the very essence of grief felt by a widow and the other woman, haunting love, and obsession.   I delight in all thrillers; whether they are fast-paced or slowly built up. The Other Widow falls into the latter unlike her debut novel, The Pocket Wife, which falls into the former. That being said, it’s just as absorbing as it steadily examines the psychological impacts of deception, vulnerability, and desire. There are so many layers of deception that compel the reader to continually question every single character and detail therein contained. Crawford’s braintwisting plot will keep readers on the edge of their seats, yearning for the next page right until the very startling end. I guarantee that you won’t put it down because I wasn’t able to do so! This is a marvelous book for enthusiastic fans of thrillers and mysteries. Moreover, readers of chick-lit and chick-noir will revel in the perspectives of Dorrie, Karen, and Maggie. The Other Widow hits bookstores today! So, make sure to head there right now. Seriously, what are you still doing here? Go pick up the book!
A huge thank you to HarperCollins Canada for selecting me to be one of ten keen readers to be a part of the First Look program. They provided me with an uncorrected proof of The Other Widow by Susan Crawford in exchange for an honest review.